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Acquisitions & Donations

Museum Policy Regarding Acquisitions (Donations and Purchases)

The Museum seeks to enhance its collections by adding, in a judicious manner, those objects that are appropriate to the Museum’s mission, officially adopted by the Board of Trustees. The Museum will acquire and preserve materials of the highest quality possible that will promote a deeper knowledge and understanding of Western American art and history.

The Art Acquisition and Artifact Acquisition Committees comprised of Museum staff and Trustees evaluate all potential acquisitions, and decide whether to approve or disapprove a given item. The Committees consider acquisitions by gift, bequest, exchange or purchase.

Works of art, objects, photographs and archival materials are accepted when certain criteria are met:

All donations are considered outright and unconditional gifts to be used at the discretion of the Museum.

The artwork or objects must, if possible, be documented as to provenance.

If you would like information about making a donation to the Museum, please contact Mary Ann Igna, Deputy Director and Curator at 928-684-2272.

When a potential donor approaches the Museum with artwork or objects that he/she wishes to donate, an Incoming Temporary Deposit Receipt is completed for all items for which the Museum is taking temporary custody. Potential donations are periodically reviewed by the Art Acquisition and Artifact Acquisition Committees to determine whether to accept or reject the materials in question based on the Museum’s acquisitions policy. After a decision has been reached, the potential donor is notified of the Committee’s decision.

Appraisals

Art and artifacts for donation are not accepted at the museum unless arrangements have been made in advance with Museum staff.

However, following written Museum policy, staff members may not authenticate, appraise or otherwise evaluate any object for insurance, commercial, or other purposes. The Museum may examine potential donations but will not offer any appraisal.

Choosing an Appraiser

In cases involving potential gifts to the Museum above certain dollar amounts, regulations of the Internal Revenue Service require that a third disinterested party perform appraisals of tax-deductible gifts to non-profit institutions, such as the Museum. Additional information can be obtained from the following associations:

Matters that you should consider, and request information about, include the following: expertise, credentials, written contract, signed statement of disinterest, appraisal documentation, type of value (fair market, replacement), fee and whether the appraiser has liability insurance.

Special note: When contracting for appraisal services with a dealer, be aware that the dealer might be interested in purchasing the item or items at or below wholesale cost.

With respect to the appraisal fee, most appraisers charge based on hourly rates. For federal tax purposes, it is illegal for the appraisal fee to be based on a percentage of the overall value of the item or items. A feasibility study may be requested of the appraiser to determine whether an appraisal is warranted. In the case of charitable contributions, the cost of an appraisal might be tax-deductible. To find out specific requirements for claims, you should contact your local IRS office or your tax accountant.

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